Four Syllables


Thursday, April 24, 2014

Puzzle by Stanley Newman / Edited by Will Shortz


EVERY ONE OF THE / CLUES HAS EXACTLY / FOUR SYLLABLES, plus all the clues, constitutes the main feature of this humdrum Thursday stunt crossword.

Other — ANGOLA (5D. Luanda’s land), CANTATA (52A. Bach choral work), HULAS and HUSTLE (9A. Grass shack dances; 9D. Disco line dance), LIFE BELTS (11D. Flotation gear), LOANER CAR (6D. Wheels for a while), OSCAR (51D. Trash can dweller), RALLYE (48D. Public-road race), RUNS AFTER (34D. Attempts to catch), TEN O’CLOCK (37D. Break time, perhaps), TEXTILE (23A. It may be felt).


————————






Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.23.14 — The Mercury Seven


Back row:  Shepard, Grissom, Cooper; 
front row: Schirra, Slayton, Glenn, Carpenter in 1980.  
This was the only time they would appear together in pressure suits.

————————

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Puzzle by David J. Kahn / Edited by Will Shortz


MERCURY / SEVEN (71A. With 1-Down, first American astronauts), along with WALLY SCHIRRA, GUS GRISSOM, ALAN SHEPARD, DEKE SLAYTON, SCOTT  CARPENTER, GORDON COOPER and JOHN GLENN constitutes the interrelated group of this Wednesday crossword.

Other — ACETALS (18A. Volatle solvents), ATROPHIED (21D. Weakened due to inactivity), ATTEMPT (63A. Stab), DOODLER (26D. School desk drawer?), ENTENTE (65A. International agreement), ERODING (15A. Whittling away), LOESSER (69A. “Luck Be a Lady” composer/ lyricist), NO REPLY (16A. Like some email addresses), ROCKET (9D. NASA vehicle), SENSORY (24D. Kind of perception), SPACE RACE (12D. Old U.S./Soviet rivalry), VAMOOSE (17A. Blow the joint), “I envy Seas, WHEREON He rides“: Emily Dickinson.


————————






Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.22.14 — Tick Tock



————————

Tuesday, April 22, 2014 — Earth Day

Puzzle by Ed Sessa / Edited by Will Shortz

TICK TOCK TICK TOCK TICK TOCK found within six answers constitutes the main feature of this Tuesday  crossword:

TICKLED pink (17A.)
COMMON STOCK (23A. It’s not preferred for investors)
TICKED OFF (32A. Peeved)
MCCLINTOCK (42A. 1963 John Wayne comedy western)
TICKET BOOTH (48A. Spot at the front of a theater)
BUTTOCK (62A. Half moon?)


Other — COSEC and SINE (12D. Trig ratio; 28D. Reciprocal of 12-Down), EEKS and EKES, KAMPALA (1A. Capital of Uganda), Smoky-voiced Eartha KITT, LOOFAH (31A. Bather’s exfoliant), MOBSTER (42D. Tony Soprano, for one), NUTCASE (18A. Fruitcake), OPEN TOE (66A. Lke some women’s shoes), SCREENS (69A. What a multiplex has a multiplicity of), STUCCO (46D. Decorative wall covering).


————————






Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.21.14 — Counterexamples


Monday, April 21, 2014

Puzzle by John Lieb / Edited by Will Shortz


Examples of counters, along with the clue of COUNTEREXAMPLES, constitutes the interrelated group of this make-of-it-as-you-will Monday crossword:

COUNTEREXAMPLES (58A. They disprove claims … or 17-, 23-, 38- and 47-Across, in a way?)
HOME PLATE UMPIRE (17A. Strike zone arbiter)
BANK MANAGER (23A. George Bailey in “It’s a Wonderful Life”)
BLACKJACK PLAYER (38A. One getting hit in Vegas?)
CENSUS TAKER (47A. Decennial taker)


Other — BATIK (7D. Tie-dye alternative), MOCCASIN (29D. Comfortable footwear), PRATFALL (19D. Buster Keaton specialty), SULTAN (45D. Ottoman bigwig), TEXACO (46D. Longtime sponsor of the Metropolitan Opera), ZAGAT (32D. Restaurant guide name since 1979).


———————— 






Click on image to enlarge, 
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.20.14 — The Magnolia Tree — the Acrostic


Sunday, April 20, 2014

Acrostic by Emily Cox and Henry Rathvon
Edited by Will Shortz


This Sunday’s acrostic draws a quotation from Cross Creek, The Magnolia Tree by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.

Originally published in 1942, Cross Creek has become a classic in modern American literature.  For the millions of readers raised on The Yearling. Here is he story of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings’s experiences in the remote Florida hamlet of Cross Creek, where she lived for thirteen years.  From the daily labors of managing a seventy-two-acre orange grove to bouts with runaway pigs. ~ amazon.com

The quotation:  THERE IS NO SUCH THING IN THE WORLD AS AN UGLY TREE, BUT THE MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA HAS A UNIQUE PERFECTION.  NO MATTER HOW… THICKLY HOLLY AND LIVE OAK AND SWEET GUM MAY GROW UP AROUND IT, IT DEVELOPS WITH COMPLETE SYMMETRY… .

The author’s name and the title of the work:  RAWLINGS / THE MAGNOLIA TREE

The defined words:

A. Split into branches, RAMIFY
B. Artist with a zoo n New Orleans named for him, AUDUBON
C. Across, from side t side, WIDTHWISE
D. Habitat for most gorillas, LOWLAND
E. Insect marked with large ocellar spots (2 wds.), IO MOTH
F. Cultivate useful connections, NETWORK
G. Move in a loud, clumsy way, GALUMPH
H. Sound or appear jerky, as audio or video, STUTTER
I. Convoluted, tortuous, TWISTY
J. Play with soldiers in France (2 wds.), HENRY V
K. Sophisticated yet simple, ELEGANT
L. Tangly growth in a tropical coastal swamp, MANGROVE
M. Character, mood, environment, ATMOSPHERE
N. Bird whose male is vibrant yellow in the summer and olive-colored in the winter, GOLDFINCH
O. Camp outing for scouts (2 wds.), NATURE HIKE
P. Epoch of global ice expansion, OLIGOCENE
Q. Player in an early music ensemble, LUTENIST
R. Study of fossil tracks, burrows and the like, ICHNOLOGY
S. Ancient shipping container with a rounded shape, AMPHORA
T. Long tops to wear with leggings, TUNICS
U. Attractions for leaf peepers (2 wds.), RED MAPLES
V. Civil rights objective, EQUALITY
W. Annual even with a green theme (2 wds.), EARTH DAY


The complete paragraph of the quotation:  The tree was a magnolia, taller than the tallest orange trees around it.  There is no such thing in the world as an ugly tree, but the magnolia grandiflora has a unique perfection.  No matter how crowded it may be, no matter how thickly holly and live oak and sweet gum may grow up around it, it develops with complete symmetry, so that one wonders whether character in all things, human as well as vegetable, may not be implicit.  Neither is its development ruthless, achieved at the expense of its neighbors, for it is one of the few trees that may be allowed to stand in an orange grove, seeming to steal nothing from the expensively nourished citrus.  The young of the tree is courteous, waiting for the parent to be done with life before presuming to take it over.  There are never seedling magnolias under or near an old magnolia.  When the tree at last dies, the young glossy sprouts appear from nowhere, exulting in the sun and air for which they may have waited a long hundred years. ~ The Magnolia Tree, Cross Creek


————————





Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.


04.20.14 — On Wheels



————————

Sunday, April 20, 2014

"On Wheels"  Puzzle by Elizabeth C. Gorski
Edited by Will Shortz


Eight automobile model names, CIVIC, SONATA, MUSTANG, SEVILLE, CHARGER, BEETLE, OPTIMA and FORESTER, found within eight across answers, along with two letter O’s beneath each model name representing tires, constitutes the main feature of this Sunday crossword.  

The across answers and their clues:

CIVIC PRIDE (23A. Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members)
HORN SONATA (25A. Recital piece for a wind player)
MUSTANG SALLY (34A. 1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit)
BARBER OF SEVILLE (54A. Opera based on a  play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with “The”
SAN DIEGO CHARGER (76A. Qualcomm Stadium athlete)
BEETLE BAILEY (93A. Walker’s strip)
OPTIMA CARD (110A. Visa alternative)
C S FORESTER (112A. “The African Queen” novelist)


Other — Shakespeare’s “Titus ANDRONICUS”, BI-ANNUAL (102A. Like equinoxes), COLD CEREAL (46D. Quaker production), SCOTT TUROW (21A. Best-selling novelist whom Time called “Bard of the Litigious Age”), SLICES INTO (36D. Cuts, as a cake), SNOWY EGRET (43D. Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners), TEAL BLUE (27A. Relative of turquoise)


————————






Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.19.14 — The Saturday Crossword




————————

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Puzzle by Stu Ockman / Edited by Will Shortz

Six fifteen-letter answers constitutes the main feature of this Saturday crossword:

LESS COMPLICATED (1A. Simpler)
ONE AFTER ANOTHER (16A. Sequential)
THE GOBLET OF FIRE (17A. Harry Potter series part)
CLEAN AS A WHISTLE (56A. Spotless)
HOSTILE REACTION (59A. Boos, e.g.)
IT TAKES ALL SORTS (60A. “Different strokes for different folks”)


Other across — 18. Can’t take, HATES; 19. One of a familiar septet, DWARF; 20. Rocks on the Rhein?, EIS; 21. Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “Cien ANOS de Soledad”; 22. Weapon in old hand-to-hand combat, DIRK; 23. Figures in “Teutonic Mythology”, ELVES; 25. “Vous etes ICI”; 26. Alaska’s KENAI Fjords National Park; 27. Candy pioneer H. B. REESE; 28. Abr. In many a military title, RET; 29. Small skillet, EGG PAN; 31. Abr. Before a date, ESTD; 32. Bg Chicago-based franchiser, IGA; 33. 1958-61 political alliance: Abbr., UAR; 35. March on Washington grp., SNCC; 38. Dirgelike, SOMBER; 42. 20-Across in English, ICE; 45. Blush, COLOR; 47. Not a good person to entrust with secrets, informally, SIEVE; 48. And moreover, NAY; 49. Answer (for), ATONE; 50. Goya figure, MAJA; 51. Part of a plowing harness, HAME; 52. Problem for Porot, CAS; 53. Quickly imagine?, ’SPOSE; 55. Swiss city that borders France and Germany, BASEL.

Down —  1. Either of two Holy Roman emperors, LOTHAIR; 2. Better, ENHANCE; 3. “Get cracking!”, SEE TO IT; 4. White-bearded types, SAGES; 5. Some budget planners, for short, CFOS; 6. Gambling inits., OTB; 7. Putting one’s cards on the table, n a way, MELDING; 8. Package for sale, say, PRE-WRAP; 9. Principal port of Syria, LATAKIA; 10. “IN OR out?”; 11. Strongbox, COFFER; 12. Raiding grp., ATF; 13. Robin Hood and hs Merry Men, THIEVES; 14. Otherworldly in the extreme, EERIEST; 15. Decent, DRESSED; 22. “Portraits at the Stock Exchange” artist, DEGAS; 24. Look that’s not liked, LEER; 26. KEG party; NUEVA York; 32. Seattle’s Space Needle or St. Louis’s Gateway Arch, ICON; 34. Something that often follows you, ARE; 35. Greta SCACCHI of “The Red Violin”; 36. Hardly any, NOT A LOT; 37. Immediate, as relatives, CLOSES; 39. Seeps, OSMOSES; 40. Actress in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”, MIA SARA; 41. Decorate fancly, BEJEWEL; 42. Bothered, IN A STIR; 43. Broadway hit with the song “I Wonder What the King Is Doing Tonight”, CAMELOT; 44. Telescope part, EYE LENS; 46. Mezzo-soprano Regina RESNIK; 51. Must, HAS TO; 54. Blanched, PALE; 55. Inexpensive writing implements, BICS; 57. AT A price; 58. Bad computer?, HAL.


———————




Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.18.14 — The Friday Crossword


Friday, April 18, 2014

Puzzle by James Mulhern / Edited by Will Shortz


Across — 1A. “Definitely, dawg!”, FO SHIZZLE; 10. Art enabled, CANST; 15. Reading room, ATHENAEUM; 16. Timeline segment, EPOCH; 17. Reward for knocking ‘em dead, STANDING O; 18. Moving supply, LITHE; 19. Bare peak, TOR; 20. Before retitling: Abbt., ORIG; 21. “It“, GLAMOR; 22. Drop, OMIT; 24. Name dropper‘s phrase, ET ALII; 26. Cousin of -kin or -let, ULE; 27. Unpaid babysitters, maybe, NANAS; 29. “Property Virgins“ cable channel, HGTV; 30. “Out!”, SCAT; 31. It‘s often described by horses, ENGINE; 33. Regard, EYE; 34. “And THRO the field the road runs by“: Tennyson; 35. Common loss after a breakup, IN-LAW; 37. Rush, RUN AT; 39. Clipper feature, MAST; 41. It can be painful to pick up, TAB; 43. Radio racket, PAYOLA; 46. Parentheses, e.g., ARCS; 47. Slight, SNUB; 49. Subject of the 2011 book “The Rogue“, PALIN; 50. Grp. Seeking to improve No Child Left Behind, NEA; 51. “Pensees“ philosopher, PASCAL; 53. It might mean “hello” or “goodbye” to a driver, TOOT; 54. Woodchuck, e.g., MARMOT; 56. Bradley with five stars, OMAR; 58. Musician who co-founded Nutopia, ONO; 59. Popular type option, ARIAL; 60. “The Pentagon Papers” Emmy nominee, ALAN ARKIN; 62. Verbal equivalent of a shrug, DUNNO; 63. Something awful, LIKE CRAZY; 64. A couple of rounds in a toaster?, EGGOS; 65. Rain forest, e.g., ECOSYSTEM.

Down — 1. Subtle trick, FAST ONE; 2. Easy chair accompanier, OTTOMAN; 3. Philanthropic mantra, SHARING IS CARING; 4. Blue symbol of Delaware, HEN; 5. Prefix with Germanc, INDO; 6. The Congolese franc replaced it, ZAIRE; 7. Crest, ZENITH; 8. What’s often on wheels n an airport, LUGGAGE; 9. Some punk, EMO; 10. Parts of many chamber groups, CELLI; 11. Pacific port, APIA; 12. Vsually uninspiring, NOT MUCH TO LOOK AT; 13. 15-Across frequenter, maybe, SCHOLAR; 14. “Add THERETO a tiger‘s caudron, / For the ingredients of our cauldron”: Shak.; 21. “No more guesses?”, GIVE UP; 23. Blots, TAINTS; 25. Astronomical distance: Abbr., LT YR; 28. T’s associated with Chris Rock and 30 Rock, SNL; 30. Occupy, STAY AT; 32. Destroys insidiously, EATS AT; 36. Pales, WANS; 38. More than nod, NAP; 39. Artificial, MAN-MADE; 40. Relative of a throw, AREA RUG; 42. Country, BUCOLIC; 44. Hero-worship, LIONIZE; 45. Learn to teach?, ANTONYM; 48. Capital on the Niger, BAMAKO; 51. Some preppy wear, POLOS; 52. Left Turn Only and others, LANES; 55. A leader and follower?, MANO; 57. A little blue, RACY; 60. It can make you squiffy, ALE; 61. Monopoly quartet: Abbr., RRS.


————————






Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.

04.17.14 — Think Through


Thursday, April 17, 2014

Puzzle by Mary Lou Guizzo and Jeff Chen
Edited by Will Shortz

THINK / THROUGH (45A. With 61-Across, carefully consider … or a clue to this puzzle’s theme), along with four to-be-imagined “think-through” answers constitutes the main feature of this perfectly dreadful Thursday crossword:

WENT (THROUGH) THE ROOF (23A and 13D. Blew one’s stack)
PAID (THROUGH) THE NOSE (24A and 15D. Spent way too much money for something)
SHOT (THROUGH) THE HEART (43A and 30D. Hit dead on)
ROSE (THROUGH) THE RANKS (46A and 32D. Followed a career ladder)

Other — AM NOT (12A. “You know nothing about me”), DUROC (50A. Hardy hog breed), GAWP (1D. Stare with an open mouth), I AM SO DEAD (33D. “My parents are going to kill me!”), I LOST IT (31A. “That put me over the edge!”), NO SWEAT (4D. "Easy peasy"), OUTHOUSE (29D. Heads for the woods?), STINK AT (20D. Can’t do well), TYCHO Brahe.

————————





Click on image to enlarge,
or Right click and select “Open Link in New Window".

Puzzle available on the internet at
THE NEW YORK TIMES — Crossword Puzzles and Games.